Disease Du Jour: Equine Emergency Medicine Tips in the Field

In Episode 56 of the Disease Du Jour podcast, we talk to Dr. Jarred Williams of the University of Georgia, about equine emergency medicine.
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colic horse down

The more subtle signs of colic mean a veterinarian needs to ask the owner more questions and look at other signalments to determine how serious the problem is.

Episode 56 of the Disease Du Jour podcast features Jarred Williams, DVM, PhD, DACVS, DACVECC, talking about Emergency Medicine Tips In the Field. He is an Associate Professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Georgia.

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Read the Transcript Here

EquiManagement’s Disease Du Jour podcast is focused on equine research and current best practices. Disease Du Jour is brought to you in 2021 by Merck Animal Health.

This year's Disease Du Jour podcasts are focused on ambulatory/field medicine. The podcasts are designed for equine veterinarians, vet students, vet techs and industry professionals.

Topics

  • Top three emergencies veterinarians see in the field
  • Questions to ask owners or referring veterinarians
  • Recommendations for supplies needed for emergency practice
  • True emergencies versus "client-perceived" emergencies
  • Emergency medicine and burnout

Williams was asked, "What are the top three emergency reasons that you get phone calls or you have veterinarians bring horses to you in the hospital?"

"So there's certainly an overwhelming top one. And, all vets and horse owners know this and that's colic, colic, colic and colic," said Williams. "And then that is probably rounded off by lacerations/abrupt lameness. And then the horse that for some reason, it's just gone off feed. They're anorexic, or we use the old term "ADR," they ain't doing right. Which is just a way to describe they're just ‘blah.’ Something's not quite right, but they're not throwing themselves on the ground or acting colicky."

Williams said that while there are owners who don't see or understand subtle signs of illness in their horses, there are others who "are so attentive that they notice subtle things." He said it is up to the veterinarian to either get through the emotion of the anxious owner or to not dismiss the observations of the astute owner.

You can find out the "must-have" items Williams recommends that every vet have in her/his practice vehicle in the podcast.

When talking about lameness emergency calls, Williams said, "Most lamenesses, especially acute illnesses that you'll get called on, it’s a foot abscess. And if it's not a foot abscess, then it's a foot abscess. And if it's not a foot abscess, then it's still a foot abscess. But every now and then it's something much worse than that."

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EquiManagement’s Disease Du Jour podcast is focused on equine research and current best practices. Disease Du Jour is brought to you in 2021 by Merck Animal Health.

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