More Equine WNV in Michigan, Oklahoma and Utah

Horses in Michigan and Utah continue to be affected by West Nile virus, and Oklahoma reports first case for 2017.
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Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

Michigan Reports 14th Equine WNV for 2017

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development received confirmation of an unvaccinated, one-year-old Standardbred filly from Hillsdale County that tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). The horse developed acute neurologic disease and was euthanized. No quarantines were issued. 

This case brings the total number of reported cases of WNV in Michigan in 2017 to 14, one case from each of the following counties: Clinton, Hillsdale, Jackson, Livingston, Mecosta, Midland, Missaukee, Montcalm, Osceola, Ottawa, Roscommon, and St Joseph Counties, and two cases from Wexford County.

Oklahoma's First Equine WNV Case for 2017

The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Foresty confirmed the state's first case of West Nile virus for 2017 in a 12-year-old Quarter Horse gelding in Logan County. The horse was showing severe neurologic signs and was euthanized.

Utah Adds More Equine WNV Cases for 2017

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food confirmed West Nile virus in four horses between September 21 and September 25 in Weber, Cache and Uintah Counties. Horses included a 3-year-old Quarter Horse gelding, a 6-year-old Quarter Horse mare, a Quarter Horse gelding of unknown age, and a 6-year-old mare of unknown breed and age. 

Two of the four horses were treated and are recovering and two horses were euthanized. A fifth horse presenting with neurologic signs suggestive of WNV did not have samples submitted and was euthanized due to the severity of clinical signs. 

The Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC) works to protect horses and the horse industry from the threat of infectious diseases in North America. The communication system is designed to seek and report real time information about disease outbreaks similar to how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) alerts the human population about diseases in people.