Research on Morphological Variations in the Caudal Cervical Spine in Warmbloods

This study investigated the clinical relevance of radiographically visible morphologic variations in the caudal cervical vertebrae of Warmbloods.
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warmblood horse in field

Radiographic morphologic variations in the caudal cervical spine are more common in horses without relevant clinical signs and so should be interpreted with care.

This case-control study investigated the clinical relevance of radiographically visible morphologic variations in the caudal cervical vertebrae of Warmbloods.

The article on the research was titled "Caudal cervical vertebral morphological variation is not associated with clinical signs in Warmblood horses" and was authored by Veraa, S.; de Graaf, K.; Wijnberg, I.D.; Back, W.; Vernooij, H.; Nielen, M.; and Belt, A.J.M.

You can access this article on the Wiley online library.

About the Study

Cervical radiographic examinations of all Warmblood horses (with and without clinical signs) performed between January 2011 and December 2013 were reviewed by a board certified radiologist. Morphologic variations recorded included absence of a ventral laminar part of the transverse process in combination with a ventral protuberance at another transverse process and the presence or absence of degenerative joint disease of the articular facet joint of C6 and C7. 

Clinical signs considered relevant included spinal ataxia, restricted flexion of the neck, cervical pain on palpation, abnormal behavior (e.g., head shaking, bolting), cervical muscle atrophy, presumed thoracic neurological lameness and hypermetric gait. Univariable Pearson’s Chi‐square and multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the cases (horses with clinical signs) and controls (horses with no clinical signs).

In total, 245 cases and 132 controls were included in the study. Morphologic variation at C6 and C7 was significantly less frequent in horses with clinical signs (23.7%) compared to the control group (38%). Age, sex, breed and degenerative joint disease were not associated with the presence of clinical signs.

Bottom Line

Radiographic morphologic variations in the caudal cervical spine are more common in horses without relevant clinical signs and so should be interpreted with care.

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