Research on CO2 to Treat Equine Laminitis

Carbon dioxide is reported to decrease HIF concentrations while also decreasing inflammation-inducing compounds.

Richard Rivers, MD, PhD, suggests that the initial acute phase of the first 4-60 hours offers a window of opportunity to “use vasoactive medications that can increase blood flow and reverse the ischemia.” iStock/Panida-Wijitpanya

Research by a microvascular physiologist at John Hopkins University, Richard Rivers, MD, PhD, has focused on management of laminitis. His paper compares the pathophysiology of laminitis to Raynaud’s disease in humans, which is caused by vasospasm. He suggests that the initial acute phase of the first 4-60 hours offers a window of opportunity to “use vasoactive medications that can increase blood flow and reverse the ischemia” [https://www.airjectorvet.com/white-papers/laminitis].

He explains that low oxygen resulting from vasospasm increases hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which interferes with proteins that protect the cell during hypoxia. Carbon dioxide is reported to decrease HIF concentrations while also decreasing inflammation-inducing compounds.

Inflammation is additionally associated with reperfusion injury following acute vasospasm. This generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are likely to further destroy normal laminitic tissue. Carbon dioxide is reported to reduce ROS activity.

The recommendation from the research is to apply carbon dioxide transdermally (through the skin) as a means of increasing tissue blood flow, and thereby improving oxygenation of the tissues. This has been proven effective in microcirculation and human studies. The Airjector-Vet device is designed to provide carbon dioxide therapy transdermally over a 20-30 minute therapy period for the treatment of laminitis. It works best on wet skin. Diffusion of CO2 through the skin allows it to achieve a therapeutic response in deeper tissues, especially since CO2 is soluble in soft tissue and moves toward lower concentrations. [https://www.airjectorvet.com/scientificliterature].

categories
tags
Trending Articles
Equine Ultrasound Exam
How To Turn Your Veterinary Equipment Into a Revenue Stream 
A30R9540
Disease Du Jour: Regulatory Veterinary Medicine for Horses 
Young attractive veterinarian standing beside horses on the ranch with copy space
The Business of Practice: Starting Your Own Equine Practice  
madigan-foal-compression-1-min
Madigan Foal Squeeze Technique
Newsletter
Get the best from EquiManagement delivered straight to your inbox once a week! Topics include horse care, disease alerts, and vet practitioner updates.

"*" indicates required fields

Name*
Country*

Additional Offers

Untitled
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.