Research on SAA and Fibrinogen in Horses Undergoing Emergency Exploratory Celiotomy

Measuring SAA daily and fibrinogen at admission might help predict the development of post-operative complications in horses undergoing emergency exploratory celiotomy.

This study aimed to compare serum amyloid A (SAA) and plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen) concentrations in the immediate post-operative period in horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for colic unresponsive to medical management. Amy Dragoo

This study aimed to compare serum amyloid A (SAA) and plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen) concentrations in the immediate post-operative period in horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for colic unresponsive to medical management.

All horses received preoperative procaine benzylpenicillin (20 mg/kg bwt), gentamicin sulphate (6.6 mg/kg bwt) and flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg bwt). Post-operatively, all horses received balanced polyionic intravenous fluids, with some also receiving a 2% lidocaine continuous rate infusion. Gentamicin sulphate and procaine benzylpenicillin were continued for 24–120 h, and flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg bwt intravenously twice daily) was continued for a further for 3–5 days. [SAA] and [fibrinogen] were measured prior to surgery at admission and daily for 5 days following surgery.

In total, 300 horses were included in the study, 52.0% of which developed post-operative complications and 83.7% survived to discharge. Median SAA on days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 and median fibrinogen on days 3, 4 and 5 were significantly different between horses that did and did not develop post-operative complications, whilst median SAA on days 1, 4 and 5 were significantly different between horses that did and did not survive to discharge. Post-operative complications were associated with strangulating lesions and higher fibrinogen at admission. Survival to discharge was associated with lower SAA at five days post-operatively.

Bottom line: Measuring SAA daily and fibrinogen at admission might help predict the development of post-operative complications.

The authors of this study were De Cozar, M.; Sherlock, C.; Knowles, E.; Mair, T.

To read or purchase access to this article visit the Wiley online library website.

equimanagement signup

Partners

aaep media partner
avma plit
weva logo
nzeva logo
iselp logo
aaevt logo
naep logo
epm society partner logo
mexican equine vet association logo